Is Red Meat a Silent killer?

red meat

 

Is red meat consumption linked to colorectal cancer? It is one of the most debated topic in recent years. Bowel Cancer Australia Nutritionist Teresa Mitchell-Paterson’s recent statement strengthen this  argument about red meat.

How much red meat can be consumed?

For her it’s about how much red meat we are consuming. If we are consuming 500 grams of red meat or 500 grams of red meat combined with processed meat like bacon, salami or sausages per week, that’s the amount we try to stay below.

In order to make sure that we are  not going over 500 grams, she recommends to see the size of our hands. According to her,  our palm should be taken as a measurement of how much red meat we can have. She says ”You can have two palms’ worth a week of 3-4cm thickness.That is  two steaks, or one steak and some ham, so you can see how quickly you would get to 500 grams.”

The World Health Organisation in their last iteration said the amount of red meat that can be consumed should should not exceed 500 grams. But now they have decreased it to 300 grams.

Why Red Meat is not good for your Bowel?

The normal time taken to digest a food is 24 hrs. But  depending on the type of food consumed this duration can increase. It is said that  red meat may take around four days to digest.

If you’re burning the red meat for charring a sausage on the barbecue, the meat used may undergo some chemical changes in regards to fat and iron. It will release some bad compounds like polycyclic aromatic, hydrocarbons, heterocyclic aromatic amines and N-nitroso compounds which can turn highly toxic in the bowel itself.

Mitchell-Paterson says”These chemicals sit against the bowel wall and, in a way, they irritate it. This can cause an increase in inflammation, a quicker turnover of cells and the potential for cancer to become evident in that area”

A step towards healthy habits!

We cannot prevent bowel cancer ,but however we can reduce the risk of getting this cancer by making small changes in our lifestyle and food habits like spending 30 min for daily exercise, consuming fiber rich food,  reducing the consumption of red and processed meat, quiting smoking and reducing alcohol consumption etc. Remember! A small step towards healthy habits can make big changes in your life!

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Haemorrhoids | Symptoms and Treatments Sydney Australia

Hemorrhoids are cluster of blood vessels in the rectum. The hemorrhoidal veins are located in the lowest area of the rectum. Sometimes they swell when the veins enlarge and their walls become stretched, thin, and irritated by passing stool.

We all have haemorrhoidal vessels, but we don’t all have haemorrhoids. 50% of people mote than the age of 50 years have some degree of symptomatic haemorrhoids.

Hemorrhoids are categorised into two categories:

1) Internal

2) External

hemorrhoids
Haemorrhoids

The external haemorrhoidal vessels covered by skin which can become external haemorrhoids. The internal haemorrhoidal vessels covered by the lining of the rectum, known as mucosa, which as its name suggests secretes mucous, and is easily traumatised by stretching and can bleed.

Haemorrhoids all form due to some form of straining, but are often associated with constipation, diarrhoea, inadequate fibre in the diet, pregnancy, obesity and liver disease.

Symptoms Of Haemorrhoids

The common symptoms associated with haemorrhoids are bleeding (from internal) and prolapse (can be internal and/or external) haemorrhoids. Itch may be a symptom, and pain is less often associated with haemorrhoids and may indicate an anal fissure or an acute thrombosed external
For most patients with simple and symptomatic internal and/or external haemorrhoids, appropriate advice on dietary fibre and water intake, along with bathroom and defecatory habits, are the mainstay of initial and longstanding focus, whether interventional haemorrhoidal treatments are required or not.

Treatments

The treatment of haemorrhoids depends on whether they are internal and/or external, and whether they are bleeding and how much they are prolapsing.

Many patients present having used various creams, which though they can bring some relief of symptoms, may also become the cause of symptoms.
Treatments include; Rubber band ligation, Injection scleortherapy, Haemorrhoidectomy and Haemorrhoidal artery ligation.

Colon and rectal cancer Sydney: Causes, Symptoms and Treatments

Colorectal cancer (bowel cancer) is a very common cancer in Australia. It affects about 1 in 20 persons in Australia. Colorectal cancer becomes more common with age. Most patients with colorectal cancer develop the condition between 55 and 75 years of age. Men and women are equally affected although cancers of the rectum occur more frequently in men.

Who gets Colorectal Cancer?

This cancer becomes more common with age. Most patients with the cancer develop the condition between 55 and 75 years of age. Men and women are equally affected although cancers of the rectum occur more frequently in men. Patients with a family history of cancer or polyps have a higher risk of developing the cancer. The risk of these increases with the number of risk factors such as: the number of family members with colorectal cancer (especially if on the same side of the family), younger age at diagnosis of the cancer, multiple cancers in the same individual. Some conditions of the bowel also predispose to colorectal cancer including ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. Maintaining a healthy lifestyle with regular exercise and maintaining a balanced diet low in saturated fats may also help reduce the risk of bowel cancer.

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What symptoms do patients with Colorectal cancer have?

 

The type of symptoms experienced varies depending on the location of the cancer and how early or advanced the cancer is. Common symptoms include change in bowel habits, rectal bleeding, abdominal pain, weight loss and anaemia. Patients may have cancers detected at the asymptomatic stage with a stool test which forms the bowel cancer screening program.

Tests for Colorectal cancer:

 Most patients with a colorectal cancer will require several tests to confirm the diagnosis of cancer and to allow the doctor to determine has spread. These tests include

  • Colonoscopy– this allows the surgeon to determine the location of the tumor and to take a sample at the time to confirm the diagnosis
  • CT scan – to check the lungs and liver to determine if the tumour has spread
  • CEA – this is a tumour marker that can be helpful in confirming diagnosis and may allow for early detection of cancer recurrence after treatment
  • Patients with rectal cancer may also be required to undergo an MRI of the pelvis, PET scan and/ or a trans rectal ultrasound.

Treatment for Colorectal cancer:

The mainstay treatment of colorectal cancer is surgery. This involves removal of the part of the bowel where the tumour is located as well as the lymph glands surrounding this part of bowel. Most patients will be able to have the ends of the bowel re-joined together although some patients may require a temporary or permanent stoma bag. After surgery, the cancer will be sent for further analysis which will determine if chemotherapy is necessary. Patients with rectal cancer may also require radiotherapy.

 

More information can be found at http://www.bowelcanceraustralia.org

WELCOME TO CENTRAL SYDNEY COLORECTAL SURGEONS

Colorectal cancer (bowel cancer) is a very common cancer in Australia. Colorectal cancer is the third most common type of cancer in men and women in the United States It affects about 1 in 20 persons in Australia. Colorectal becomes more common with age. Most patients with colorectal cancer develop the condition between 55 and 75 years of age. Men and women are equally affected although cancers of the rectum.

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Colorectal cancer starts in the colon or rectum. The colon and the rectum are parts of the large intestine, which is the lower part of the body’s digestive system. During digestion, food moves through the stomach and small intestine into the colon.

Colonoscopy is the best test for detection of cancer there is a small risk of missing a small cancer. The risks and benefits of colonoscopy should be discussed in detail with your doctor prior to proceeding with the test.The specific details of your colonoscopy bowel preparation will be discussed and given to you at the time of your consultation

 

Symptoms of colorectal cancer

  • Going to the toilet more often.
  • Diarrhea
  • Constipation
  • A feeling that the bowel does not empty properly after a bowel movement.
  • Blood in feces (stools).
  • Pains in the abdomen.
  • Bloating in the abdomen.
  • A feeling of fullness in the abdomen (maybe even after not eating for a while).
  • Fatigue (tiredness).
  • Inexplicable weight loss.
  • A lump in the tummy or a lump in the back passage felt by your doctor.
  • Unexplained iron deficiency in men, or in women after the menopause.

 

Colorectal cancer risk factors you can change

 

  • Being overweight or obese
  • Physical inactivity
  • Certain types of diets – Red meats and  processed meats
  • Smoking
  • Heavy alcohol use

About:

Our team of well trained colorectal surgeons are committed to the diagnosis and treatment of your colorectal condition. Our surgeons consult from Royal Prince Alfred Hospital (RPAH) Medical Centre, and if required organise procedures at RPAH and Sydney Day Surgery.

 

 

Bowel Cancer Commonly know as Colorectal Cancer

Bowel cancer is also called colorectal cancer and includes large bowel cancer (colon cancer) and cancer of the back passage (rectal cancer or cancer of the rectum). Find out about bowel cancer symptoms, risk factors, causes and preventing bowel cancer. There is information about tests to diagnose bowel cancer and treatments including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, biological therapy, research and clinical trials. The living with bowel cancer section has information about diet after surgery, managing a colostomy, and how cancer may affect your sex life.

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Symptoms of bowel cancer

The symptoms of bowel (colorectal) cancer can include

  • Bleeding from the back passage (rectum) or blood in your poo
  • A change in normal bowel habits
  • A lump that your doctor can feel in your back passage or abdomen (more commonly on the right side)
  • A feeling of needing to strain in your back passage (as if you need to pass a bowel motion), even after opening your bowels
  • Losing weight
  • Pain in your abdomen or back passage
  • A lower than normal level of red blood cells (anaemia)

Because bowel tumours can bleed, cancer of the bowel often causes a shortage of red blood cells. This is called anaemia and may cause tiredness and sometimes breathlessness.

Sometimes cancer can block the bowel. This is called a bowel obstruction. The symptoms include

  • Griping pains in the abdomen
  • Feeling bloated
  • Constipation and being unable to pass wind
  • Being sick

Causes of bowel cancer

The fallowing causes are as fallows:

Age

Your chances of developing bowel cancer increase as you get older. Almost 9 out of 10 cases of bowel cancer in the UK are diagnosed in people over the age of 60.

Family history

Having a family history of bowel cancer can increase your risk of developing the condition yourself, particularly if a close relative (mother, father, brother or sister) was diagnosed with bowel cancer below the age of 50.

If you are particularly concerned that your family’s medical history may mean you are at an increased risk of developing bowel cancer, it may help to speak to your GP.

If necessary, your GP can refer you to a genetics specialist, who can offer more advice about your level of risk and recommend any necessary tests to periodically check for the condition.

Diet

A large body of evidence suggests a diet high in red and processed meat can increase your risk of developing bowel cancer.

For this reason, the Department of Health advises people who eat more than 90g (cooked weight) a day of red and processed meat cut down to 70g a day.

Read more about red meat and bowel cancer risk.

There is also evidence that suggests a diet high in fibre could help reduce your bowel cancer risk.

Read more about eating good food and a healthy diet.

Smoking

People who smoke cigarettes are more likely to develop bowel cancer, other types of cancer, and other serious conditions, such as heart disease.

Alcohol

Drinking alcohol has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of bowel cancer, particularly if you regularly drink large amounts.

Read about drinking and alcohol for more information and tips on cutting down.

Obesity

Being overweight or obese is linked to an increased risk of bowel cancer, particularly in men.

If you are overweight or obese, losing weight may help lower your chances of developing the condition.

Inactivity

People who are physically inactive have a higher risk of developing bowel cancer.

You can help reduce your risk of bowel and other cancers by being physically active every day.

Digestive disorders

Some conditions affecting the bowel may put you at a higher risk of developing bowel cancer. For example, bowel cancer is more common in people who have had severe Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis for many years.

If you have one of these conditions, you will usually have regular check-ups to look for signs of bowel cancer from about 10 years after your symptoms first develop.

Check-ups will involve examining your bowel with a colonoscope – a long, narrow flexible tube that contains a small camera – that is inserted into your rectum.

The frequency of the colonoscopy examinations will increase the longer you live with the condition, and will also depend on factors such as how severe your ulcerative colitis is and if you have a family history of bowel cancer.

Genetic conditions

There are two rare inherited conditions that can lead to bowel cancer. They are:

  • familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) – a condition that triggers the growth of non-cancerous polyps inside the bowel
  • hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), also known as Lynch syndrome – an inherited gene fault (mutation) that increases your bowel cancer risk

WELCOME TO CENTRAL SYDNEY COLORECTAL SURGEONS

Our team of well trained colorectal surgeons are committed to the diagnosis and treatment of your colorectal condition. Our surgeons consult from Royal Prince Alfred Hospital (RPAH) Medical Centre, and if required organise procedures at RPAH and Sydney Day Surgery.

Colorectal cancer (bowel cancer) is a very common cancer in Australia. It affects about 1 in 20 persons in Australia.Colorectal cancer becomes more common with age. Most patients with colorectal cancer develop the condition between 55 and 75 years of age. Men and women are equally affected although cancers of the rectum occur more frequently in men.

Colonoscopy is the best test for detection of cancer there is a small risk of missing a small cancer. The risks and benefits of colonoscopy should be discussed in detail with your doctor prior to proceeding with the test.The specific details of your colonoscopy bowel preparation will be discussed and given to you at the time of your consultation

 

Colorectal cancer, also known as bowel cancercolon cancer or rectal cancer, is any cancer (a growth, lump) of the colon and the rectum. The World Health Organization and CDC say it is the second most common cancer worldwide, after lung cancer.

The American Cancer Society suggests that about 1 in 20 people in the US will develop colorectal cancer during their lifetime, with the risk being slightly higher for men than for women. Due to advances in screening techniques and improvements in treatments, the death rate from colorectal cancer has been dropping for over 20 years.

A colorectal cancer may be benign or malignant. Benign means the tumor will not spread, while a malignant tumor consists of cells that can spread to other parts of the body and damage them.

About:

Professor Christopher Young

Professor Young is Head of the Department of Colorectal Surgery at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital. He is a member of the Training Board in Colon and Rectal Surgery and the RACS Board of Surgical Research. He is past Chairman of the RACS Board In General Surgery. He operates at RPA and Concord Hospitals.

Professor Young’s interests include surgical education and decision making. His colorectal interests include rectal cancer, inflammatory bowel disease and pelvic floor dysfuction. He underwent specialty colorectal training at RPAH, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Concord Hospital and at the Cleveland Clinic, Ohio, USA.
His 2013 book Examination Surgery is an indispensable study guide to help surgical trainees prepare and perform for their fellowship exam.